skip to Main Content

Senseis’ Voices

Valentine’s Day in Japan

ともチョコ、ファミチョコ、マイチョコ、チョコ

Did you buy chocolates for Valentine’s Day? In Japan, women have long been known to buy honmei choko, or “true feeling chocolate” for men they show romantic interest in, and giri choko, or “obligatory chocolate” for male colleagues. Men then reciprocate with gifts on White Day (14 March).

However, more and more men are now buying Valentine’s day chocolates, leading to the coining of the term choko-o (chocolate man). More recently, giri choko are referred to as shea (share) choko, or sankyuu (thank you) choko. There are other new terms such as mai choko, tomo choko and fami choko. Mai choko is chocolate bought for the sole purpose of consuming by oneself.  It is also known as jibun choko or ore choko. Ore is a masculine term meaning ‘I’ or ‘me’, hence a chocolate for oneself.

The tomo in tomo choko is for tomodachi (friend), and the fami in fami choko for family. There’s also mama choko and papa choko. Both children and adults, male and female buy mai choko, tomo choko and fami choko. Being for friends and family, there’s no romantic meaning attached to this gesture.

Valentine’s Day was introduced to Japan around 1950. On average each person spends around 4 to 5 thousand yen on chocolates (around 60 – 70 AUD) every year. While the gifts are far from the scale of a Christmas present, they are a conduit for expressing feelings of appreciation to the people around them.

バレンタインのチョコを買いましたか。女の人が好きな男の人にあげる「本命ほんめいチョコ」、職場の男性にあげる「義理ぎりチョコ」は有名です。男性はホワイトデー(3月14日)にお返しをします。

最近は男性もよくバレンタインデーにチョコレートを買います。このような男性を「チョコ男ちょこお」と言います。また、最近は「義理チョコ」と言わないで、「シェアチョコ」または「サンキューチョコ」と言うそうです。「マイチョコ」「友チョコともちょこ」「ファミチョコ」など、新しい言葉もあります。「マイチョコ」は、自分じぶんのために買います。自分の好きなチョコレートを買って、自分で食べます。「自分チョコ」「おれチョコ」とも言います。「おれ」は男性が使う言葉です。だから、男性がバレンタインデーに自分のために買うチョコレートです。

「友チョコ」の「友」は「友だち」で、「ファミチョコ」の「ファミ」は家族です。「ママチョコ」「パパチョコ」もあります。子どもも大人も、男性も女性も「マイチョコ」「友チョコ」「ファミチョコ」を買います。友だちや家族にあげるチョコレートですから、ロマンチックなメッセージではありません。

日本のバレンタインデーは1950年ごろから始まりました。平均で毎年一人4000円から5000円ぐらい、チョコレートを買います。クリスマスほど大きいプレゼントではありませんが、周りの人にちょっとした感謝かんしゃを伝えるためのツールなのです。

Related Links

Top photo: whale | Haline Ly

Back To Top