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Japanese Studies Mini Grants

FY2020-21 Mini Grant Program

**Allocations exhausted (as of November 30, 2020).** 

Deadline: 2 months before commencement of applicant’s project

Applications accepted until February 15, 2021 or until funding is exhausted. All projects and reporting must be completed by March 15, 2021.

Japanese Studies Mini Grants are designed to support small-scale local projects that will further Japan-related scholarship in Australia by contributing to intellectual exchange and the enhancement of academic networks.

The guidelines for the FY2020-21 Japanese Studies Mini Grants have changed compared with previous years in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and related restrictions. In principle, the FY2020-21 Mini Grants will focus on supporting digital projects with allocations of up to $5,000 per project. Other types of projects, and requests for larger amounts of funding for larger projects, may be considered.

Download Guidelines (PDF/195 KB)

Mini Grant Recipients

ANJeL logo
JSAA logo

The Australian Network for Japanese Law (ANJeL) & Japanese Studies Association of Australia (JSAA)
Online

Japanese Law in Context: Interviews and Podcasts

This project will produce and widely disseminate a series of 15-20 video-recorded interviews or podcasts involving Japanese Law experts across Australia, Japan, North America and other parts of Asia, to: (a) supplement courses in Japanese Law (and Japanese Studies more generally) in universities; (b) increase community awareness and engagement with Japanese law in socio-economic and comparative context; (c) create a snapshot and oral history of Japanese Law studies; all mainly for Australia but also Japan and beyond.

For more information, see this post by project director Professor Luke Nottage on The University of Sydney’s Japanese Law and the Asia Pacific blog site.

(November 2020)

International Centre for Ecotourism Research, Griffith University
Online

Mental Health Effects of Nature Deprivation during COVID-19 in Japan

This project will use the disruptions created by the COVID-19 pandemic, and associated social restrictions including deprivation of nature, to test the importance of access and experiences in nature to maintain individual mental health. We have similar research in progress in other countries, but since the concept of shinrin-yoku originated in Japan, we are keen to obtain data from Japan specifically.

Our research pre-COVID showed that the economic value of nature via the mental health of visitors is at least US$6 trillion per annum worldwide (Nature Communications 10:5005, 2019), and we are continuing that research to determine how per-capita values differ between population segments and depend on the details of the experience, and how outdoor tourism and recreation can be adapted to create nature therapies as part of mainstream healthcare.

For this project, we will conduct a qualitative ethnographic analysis of online sources (‘netnography’) addressing the questions above. We will identify Japanese-language social media posts and blogs, focussing on subject-specific groups such as Facebook® Groups, where members discuss topics such as mental health, visiting parks, outdoor hiking, camping, birdwatching, wildlife photography, and adventure activities such as climbing, skiing, kayaking, etc. We have already used this approach to address this topic in other countries, and we have a smaller scale international comparison of COVID-19 lockdown effects in 17 nations, but it is all in English. Neither ourselves, nor any other research groups that we know of, have yet carried out a comparable analysis of Japanese language posts, by citizens of Japan, using Japanese social media.

The project will address this research gap, and the research and analysis from this project will be collated into teaching materials which will be made freely available for use on online teaching at tertiary level.

(November 2020)

School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Melbourne
Online

‘Research at a Distance: Japanese Studies in an Age of Covid-19’ Online Workshop (January 21-22, 2021)

The Covid-19 pandemic and related restrictions present a serious challenge to Australia-based scholars wanting to conduct data collection and/or archival research in Japan. This workshop will help scholars to respond meaningfully to the pandemic, its impact on Japanese society, and on scholarship about Japan. The first day of the workshop is open to the public and will include presentations from three scholars—David Slater (Sophia), Rebecca Corbett (USC) and Paula Curtis (Yale)—speaking from diverse perspectives on the emerging implications of Covid-19 for Japan and for the practice of Japan Studies. The second day consists of intensive mentoring sessions and collaborative workshopping for scholars looking to adapt their research plans to digital scholarship and limited/remote ethnographic methods.

Go to website>>

(November 2020)

Japanese Studies Centre
Monash University
November 4, 2019

Gender, Media and Japan’s Imperial Succession
International Symposium

In line with the beginning of the new Reiwa era in Japan, This event examines what kinds of possibilities the new era brings for change in the role of the Emperor, change within Japanese society, and change for Japan’s international relations. It also brings into focus the gendered nature of succession, bypassing the only child of the Emperor, Princess Aiko.

The symposium aims to explore:

  1. the nature of the Japanese and international media coverage of the reign change and accompanying rituals
  2. changing Japanese attitudes to the Emperor system
  3. the significance of the rituals surrounding the accession and enthronement and how that significance has changed in this fifth enthronement in the modern era
  4. the recent law excluding female succession and the impact of this exclusion on the status and morale of Japanese women, and how it reflects the status quo of Japanese women’s position
  5. the reactions of other countries to this momentous changeover, particularly those of China and Korea
  6. the extent to which the imperial succession provides a chance to reassess Australia-Japan relations

(September 2019)

School of Architecture
University of Technology, Sydney (UTS)
August 29, 2019

Japan Lecture Series (Architecture)
Erika Nakagawa: The Possibility of Large Models
Yuji Harada: Ode to the Time
Public Lecture and Review Session

The UTS School of Architecture’s Japan Lecture Series is a 3-semester program of lectures by some of the most relevant figures in contemporary Japanese architecture, as part of an ongoing project of relocating the School within the Indo-Pacific area and establishing further architectural relationships with Japan. Onishimaki+Hyakudayuki and Go Hasegawa participated in 2018. Junya Ishigami and Sou Fujimoto architects are among the proposed speakers for the remainder of the series. In addition to their practice, the candidates for this series also hold important academic positions.

The lecture will be a free event open to the public at UTS. Nakagawa and Harada will lead the audience through practice projects and explain some of their renowned completed projects, followed by conversation with a UTS faculty member.

The Review Session is a day-long event where international experts evaluate work by Master students. Selected students will present their work, and the speakers will establish a conversation with the students though their projects in a traditional architectural reviews session. The speakers will be part of a team of 3-4 external reviewers who will engage in conversation about the projects based on their own experience and practice, with 5-10 faculty and 60-120 students in attendance throughout the day.

(August 2019)

Asia Institute
The University of Melbourne
March 12, 2019

Public Lecture 
Reinventing Fukushima: Post-Disaster Recovery and the Japanese Energy Transition

Speaker: Professor Miranda Schreurs, Freie Universität Berlin

This talk examines how Fukushima’s disaster recovery is becoming a driver for a prefectural energy revolution. The region is becoming a leader in the introduction of renewable energy and the building of smart energy communities. It has set an ambitious 100 per cent renewable energy goal and has massively expanded its renewable energy installations. Yet many challenges remain to the realisation of a new beginning and new ones are emerging (such as opposition to mega solar projects).

Speaker Miranda Schreurs’ main research areas are in international and comparative climate policy, environmental politics, and lowcarbon energy transitions. She is involved in projects examining the energy transitions in Germany and Japan; climate policies of Europe, the United States, and China; and the politics of high-level radioactive waste disposal. In 2011 Schreurs was appointed by Chancellor Angela Merkel as a member of the German Ethics Commission on a Safe Energy Supply in the wake of the Fukushima catastrophe. From 2008 until 2016 she served as member of the German Advisory Council on the Environment and is vice chair of the European Environment and Sustainable Development Advisory Councils.

She researched and taught at various universities in Japan and the U.S. before becoming director of the Environmental Policy Research Center and Professor of Comparative Politics at the Freie Universität Berlin in 2007.

About the event

(March 2019)

School of Architecture
University of Technology, Sydney (UTS)
August 30-31, 2018

Japan Lecture Series: OnishiMaki + HyakudaYuki architects
Public Lecture and Review Session

The UTS School of Architecture’s Japan Lecture Series is a 3-semester program of lectures by some of the most relevant figures in contemporary Japanese architecture, as part of an ongoing project of relocating the School within the Indo-Pacific area and establishing further architectural relationships with Japan. Onishimaki+Hyakudayuki, Junya Ishigami, Go Hasegawa, Ryue Nishizawa and Tezuka architects are among the proposed speakers for the series. In addition to their practice, the candidates also hold important academic positions.

The lecture will be a free event open to the public at UTS. Onishi and Hyakuda will lead the audience through practice projects and explain some of their renowned completed projects, followed by conversation with a UTS faculty member.

The Review Session is a day-long event where international experts evaluate work by Master students. Selected students will present their work, and the speakers will establish a conversation with the students though their projects in a traditional architectural reviews session. The speakers will be part of a team of 3-4 external reviewers who will engage in conversation about the projects based on their own experience and practice, with 5-10 faculty and 60-120 students in attendance throughout the day.

Japan Lecture Series: OnishiMaki + HyakudaYuki Create Spaces with Diversity

(August 2018)

Macquarie University (NSW)
March 2018

Collaborative Robotics: Communication and Social Acceptance
This project aims to lay the foundation for interdisciplinary collaborative opportunities between Macquarie University and Kyoto Institute of Technology in the area of communicative robots with AI capabilities. The project’s focus is to identify cross-cultural differences in how robots’ communicative performances are received in society, particularly in Japanese and Australian contexts, and to conceptualise strategies for developing AI for use in communicative robots in cross-cultural situations.

(March 2018)

School of Languages and Cultures
University of Queensland
February 6-7, 2018

Unlocking the International Possibilities of Shōjo Studies
This project comprises a small symposium consisting of a public panel discussion, masterclass and informal networking sessions. These events aim to foster intellectual exchange in the field of Japanese shōjo (girl) studies, with a particular focus on Japanese texts that depict the world outside Japan, as well as on the position of shōjotexts, theory, and practices beyond Japan’s borders. This project will bring together Japanese Studies scholars with connections to the United States, Australia, and New Zealand, and aim to share knowledge and experience across three ‘generations’ of researchers in the field: established experts; emerging specialists; and both undergraduate and postgraduate students.

Listen to the podcast

(March 2018)

Asia Institute
University of Melbourne
November 15-18, 2016

Workshop & Masterclass: ‘Language and Global Media’
This project comprised a workshop and masterclasses in which leading international scholars from Ireland, New Zealand and Japan and local early career researchers presented their research in fields including writing systems, global media, discourse, language and identity, translation, and queer and gender studies. Cross-disciplinary discussion was a key outcome of the project, as was facilitating knowledge sharing between established academics and emerging researchers, and establishing networks for future collaborative work.

(November 2016)

FAQ: Japanese Studies Mini Grants

How do I apply for a mini grant?

Please contact the Japanese Studies Department (see contact details at the top right of this page) with a brief outline of your project to confirm that it fits within the remit of the grant program. If your project is a fit, a team member will send an application form for you to complete.

Can I use mini grant funding to attend a conference in Japan?

No. Mini grants are designed to bring Japan-related expertise to Australia or to facilitate Japan-related research dialogue in Australia. Neither conference attendance nor travel from Australia to Japan fall under the remit of this program.

Can I use mini grant funding to bring a scholar to Australia to give a Japan-related guest lecture?

Yes. The mini grant program can be used to fund travel, publicity and venue-related expenses for guest lectures by Japan-related scholars from any region and of any nationality (within the bounds of relevant COVID-19 restrictions), as long as their expertise is connected to Japan.

Do mini grants cover catering for networking events?

No, catering expenses are not eligible under this program. Examples of eligible expenses include venue hire, publicity costs (e.g., flyer production and printing) and travel expenses for visiting scholars.

Can I pay for administrative staff or research assistants with mini grant funds?

Administrative expenses are generally not eligible for funding. However, remuneration for specialist staff can be covered by the grant on an honorarium basis.

Other Japanese Studies grants
Other grants offered by The Japan Foundation

Can’t find what you’re looking for?
Take a look at these funding opportunities offered by other organisations.

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